Posts tagged politics

nonplussedbyreligion:

Dennis Terry Introduces Rick Santorum

Greenwell Springs Baptist Church pastor Dennis Terry introduces Rick Santorum at a campaign and tells everyone who doesn’t agree that America is a Christian nation, that they are free to “get out.”   Then he goes on to talk out against abortion, homosexuality, traditional marriage, and all the other religious bigotry that makes up Santorum and company.  He believes the church is to be the conscience of the nation.  Clearly his nation is to only consist of Right-winged, conservative, Christian nut-jobs.  

What I find all too amusing about this is ordinarily Baptists minister would be pointing out that Santorum was a Catholic and not therefore not a Christian.  I grew up Fundamental Baptist, believe me I’ve heard it on more than a few occasions. The battle line so clearly drawn any other time sure does get erased really fast when it comes to politics does it not.  I wonder what Kennedy would have to say about all of this.  Maybe he’d say this:

These are the real issues which should decide this campaign. And they are not religious issues — for war and hunger and ignorance and despair know no religious barriers.

But because I am a Catholic, and no Catholic has ever been elected president, the real issues in this campaign have been obscured — perhaps deliberately, in some quarters less responsible than this. So it is apparently necessary for me to state once again not what kind of church I believe in — for that should be important only to me — but what kind of America I believe in.

I believe in an America where the separation of church and state is absolute, where no Catholic prelate would tell the president (should he be Catholic) how to act, and no Protestant minister would tell his parishioners for whom to vote; where no church or church school is granted any public funds or political preference; and where no man is denied public office merely because his religion differs from the president who might appoint him or the people who might elect him.

I believe in an America that is officially neither Catholic, Protestant nor Jewish; where no public official either requests or accepts instructions on public policy from the Pope, the National Council of Churches or any other ecclesiastical source; where no religious body seeks to impose its will directly or indirectly upon the general populace or the public acts of its officials; and where religious liberty is so indivisible that an act against one church is treated as an act against all.  ~ JFK  Sept. 12, 1960

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nonplussedbyreligion:

Romney: “Planned Parenthood, we’re going to get rid of that.”


I love how casually he talks about getting rid of an organization that helps people with affordable help care right after he dismisses another option that might also provide affordable health care.  I’m so over these asshats.


Ugh.

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nonplussedbyreligion:

Obama on Church and State

Obama explains the importance of church-state separation in a variety of ways. What it comes down to is; In a diverse democratic society, any proposed policy must justify itself via the benefits we ALL see, rather than via arguments that only hold true to people who have one certain religious worldview. It is an honor for me to have cast my first vote as an American citizen, and my very first vote ever, in favor of this guy.Unfortunately, Obama’s presidential take on religion did not quite live up to the promise he showed in 2006: http://tinyurl.com/ObamaReligion 

“Democracy demands that the religiously motivated translate their concerns into universal, rather than religion-specific, values. It requires that their proposals be subject to argument, and amenable to reason. I may be opposed to abortion for religious reasons, but if I seek to pass a law banning the practice, I cannot simply point to the teachings of my church or evoke God’s will. I have to explain why abortion violates some principle that is accessible to people of all faiths, including those with no faith at all.”Now this is going to be difficult for some who believe in the inerrancy of the Bible, as many evangelicals do. But in a pluralistic democracy, we have no choice. Politics depends on our ability to persuade each other of common aims based on a common reality. It involves the compromise, the art of what’s possible. At some fundamental level, religion does not allow for compromise. It’s the art of the impossible. If God has spoken, then followers are expected to live up to God’s edicts, regardless of the consequences. To base one’s life on such uncompromising commitments may be sublime, but to base our policy making on such commitments would be a dangerous thing. And if you doubt that, let me give you an example.”We all know the story of Abraham and Isaac. Abraham is ordered by God to offer up his only son, and without argument, he takes Isaac to the mountaintop, binds him to an altar, and raises his knife, prepared to act as God has commanded. Of course, in the end God sends down an angel to intercede at the very last minute, and Abraham passes God’s test of devotion.”But it’s fair to say that if any of us leaving this church saw Abraham on a roof of a building raising his knife, we would, at the very least, call the police and expect the Department of Children and Family Services to take Isaac away from Abraham. We would do so because we do not hear what Abraham hears, do not see what Abraham sees, true as those experiences may be. So the best we can do is act in accordance with those things that we all see, and that we all hear, be it common laws or basic reason.” 

A full transcript of this speech from June 2006 can be found here.

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[W]hen you legislate personal belief, you’re in violation of freedom of religion. The Catholic Church may espouse its opinion on abortion to the members of its congregation. But they are in violation of separation of church and state when they try to proselytize their abortion politics on people who are not Catholics
John Irving interview, Mother Jones, May/June 1997 (via nonplussedbyreligion)

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When you took your oath of office, you placed your hand on the Bible and swore to uphold the Constitution. You didn’t place your hand on the Constitution and swear to uphold the Bible.

Jamie Raskin - who is now a senator in Maryland and served as floor manager of the recently passed bill allowing same sex marriage.  (via nowimstatic)

OH SNAP, SON.

(via regala-electra)

This is important and true for so many political contexts these days.

(via keepyourboehneroutofmyuterus)

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teachthemhowtothink:

By Frank Schaeffer - original source HERE.

The base of the Republican Party is to be pitied more than feared. They have literally been conditioned to fear their own brains. Their religious indoctrination has actually destroyed their ability to reason. No wonder…

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nonplussedbyreligion:

The GOP obsession with my private parts is getting out of hand. I’m just gonna post this without additional comments because I have NO WORDS! These assholes are getting out of hand with their bullshit. ~ Kim

Newest GOP Attack on Women: Just Say No to Tampons

"tampon" "GOP" "Republican"

In recent…

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nonplussedbyreligion:

All I want is a candidate, regardless of party, to stand up and give their stance on things that affect ALL American citizens, without invoking their personal god.  Is that too much to ask?

nonplussedbyreligion:

All I want is a candidate, regardless of party, to stand up and give their stance on things that affect ALL American citizens, without invoking their personal god.  Is that too much to ask?

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newly-poly-nyc:

occupywallstreet:

Submission from  vivais:

www.AcceptTheChallenge2012.org
This April, youth leaders and changemakers will come together to debate the biggest foreign policy challenges facing us during this 2012 election year. We’re taking a hard look at security, jobs, climate change, global justice and more, and letting the candidates know how we feel. Setting a new course for our country is our great generational challenge.
Are you a young person who understands that the local is global? Are you frustrated with our political climate, and ready to make a noise so loud that it can’t be ignored? Accept the challenge. Join us.


I approve of this poster
Re-blogging for any of my “youth” followers in DC or any who can get there.
(here’s the question…What qualifies as youth? Do they just mean high schoolers? Or is this college age as well? I think college-age as well…but the website is unclear)

newly-poly-nyc:

occupywallstreet:

Submission from  vivais:

www.AcceptTheChallenge2012.org

This April, youth leaders and changemakers will come together to debate the biggest foreign policy challenges facing us during this 2012 election year. We’re taking a hard look at security, jobs, climate change, global justice and more, and letting the candidates know how we feel. Setting a new course for our country is our great generational challenge.

Are you a young person who understands that the local is global? Are you frustrated with our political climate, and ready to make a noise so loud that it can’t be ignored? Accept the challenge. Join us.

I approve of this poster

Re-blogging for any of my “youth” followers in DC or any who can get there.

(here’s the question…What qualifies as youth? Do they just mean high schoolers? Or is this college age as well? I think college-age as well…but the website is unclear)

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cognitivedissonance:

In December 2010, Rep. John Boehner sat down with Leslie Stahl of 60 Minutes to discuss his new speakership and the future of the GOP. Then Stahl asked about compromise. The following exchange occurred:

REPRESENTATIVE JOHN BOEHNER: We have to govern, that’s what we were elected to do.

LESLEY STAHL: But governing means compromising.

REPRESENTATIVE JOHN BOEHNER: It means working together.

LESLEY STAHL: It also means compromising.

REPRESENTATIVE JOHN BOEHNER: It means finding common ground.

LESLEY STAHL: Ok, is that compromising?

REPRESENTATIVE JOHN BOEHNER: Let me be clear I am not going to compromise on my principles, nor am I going to compromise the will of the American people.

LESLEY STAHL: You’re saying “I want common ground but I’m not going to compromise.” I don’t understand that, I really don’t.

REPRESENTATIVE JOHN BOEHNER: When you say the word compromise, a lot of Americans look up and go, “oh, oh, they’re going to sell me out.” And so finding common ground, I think, makes more sense.

LESLEY STAHL: [Your] goal had been to get all the Bush tax cuts made permanent. So you did compromise.

REPRESENTATIVE JOHN BOEHNER: We found common ground.

LESLEY STAHL: Why won’t you say— you’re afraid of the word!

REPRESENTATIVE JOHN BOEHNER: I reject the word.

John Boehner won’t say the word and you can’t make him. To today’s GOP, everything is a last stand and to give an inch is to give in completely. 

image

This is the oddest election season, and I believe will go further down the rabbit hole before it ends.

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